Part II – RRSP Turns 60: Still a Good Bet for Retirement

Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) were first introduced 60 years ago, created by the federal government to help people who didn’t have a work pension to save for retirement by socking away pre-tax money.

In 1957, the threshold for the RRSP was the lesser of 10 per cent of income or $2,500.  Over the years the threshold methodology has changed.  Over the years, the threshold methodology has changed. Since 1991, the income threshold of 18 per cent of income has been used.

Starting in 1996, and continuing to today, the new contribution ceilings were indexed to the rise in average wages.

For 2017, the annual maximum, or contribution ceiling, is $26,010, which is reached when earned income is at $144,500 for the prior year.  After you file your 2016 tax return, the government communicates to taxpayers their 2017 RRSP contribution limit on the Notice of Assessment.

The calculation for the RRSP contributions limit is adjusted for individuals who have a work pension.   This reduction is referred to as a pension adjustment and also shows up on your Notice of Assessment.

A pension adjustment is done for both Defined Benefit Plans, where employers bear the risk of market-value changes, and Defined Contribution Plans, where employees bear the risk.

Pension plans have been deteriorating over the last decade.  Individuals who either do not have a pension through work, or do not have a good quality pension, should consider having an RRSP.

Outside of the two types of pensions, some employers will offer a program to help build up your RRSP, or other accounts.  In some cases, these are matching type programs, where you can put in a certain percentage of your salary, and your employer will match it, up to a defined threshold.  These are often referred to as a group RRSP and it is worth participating in.

If you have an RRSP program at work, then having that one is a must.  As you are typically restricted by the types of investments you can invest in with a group plan, we encourage people to also have one external RRSP account.

The external RRSP account would hold all the contributions done outside of your group plan.  In some cases, individuals can transfer funds from a group RRSP to an external RRSP.  In other cases, the funds must stay in a group RRSP until you cease employment with the sponsoring company.

You should receive a statement for any company sponsored pension.  Reviewing this statement is especially important if your plan is a Defined Contribution Plan where you had to make investment choices.

You have made decisions to determine the percentage to invest in fixed income versus equity and whether to have Canadian equities versus foreign equities.

If you have a group RRSP plan, you likely can view information electronically and also receive statements more frequently.

All of this information should be provided to your financial advisor, prior to making any financial decisions regarding your external RRSP.

As the quality of pension plans has deteriorated, the methodology of how to invest funds within an RRSP has changed for some investors.  The three broad categories are cash equivalents, fixed income, and equities.

In 1957, a 90 day treasury bill (cash equivalents) could be purchased with an interest rate of 3.78 per cent, climbing to 17.78 per cent in 1981.

Investing RRSPs in conservative investments, such as cash equivalents, provided decent enough returns during this period.  The latest T-Bill auction of 2016 had the 90 day treasury bills paying a yield of 0.50 per cent.   Most would agree that putting the investments within your RRSP into cash equivalents would not provide the returns to keep pace with inflation, especially after tax is factored in.

Bonds are a type of investment that is classified within fixed income.   The reason most investors purchase bonds is for capital preservation and income.  In order to achieve the goal of capital preservation, it is advisable to invest in investment-grade bonds.  Yields on these bonds are at historic lows.  The yield curve is also very flat, so purchasing a longer term investment grade bond does not increase the yield significantly enough to warrant the potential risk if interest rates rise.   The primary reason to hold bonds in an RRSP portfolio today is capital preservation.

Equity investments provide both growth and income.  In fact, the right types of common shares can pay dividend income that exceeds the interest income on most investment-grade bonds.  Portfolio values will fluctuate greater as the equity portion increases.

An advisor can put together a portfolio of lower risk stocks, often referred to as “low beta” that can reduce this volatility.  We feel those who tolerate increased volatility will be rewarded in the long run by holding the right equity investments.

Kevin Greenard CPA CA FMA CFP CIM is a Portfolio Manager and Director, Wealth Management with The Greenard Group at Scotia Wealth Management in Victoria.  His column appears every week in the TC.  Call 250.389.2138. greenardgroup.com 

This is for information purposes only. It is recommended that individuals consult with their financial advisor before acting on any information contained in this article.  The opinions stated are those of the author and not necessarily those of Scotia Capital Inc. or The Bank of Nova Scotia. ScotiaMcLeod is a division of Scotia Capital Inc., Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund.

Part IV – Real Estate: Creating Cash Flow from the Proceeds from Selling Your House

Prior to selling your home, we encourage you to have a clear plan of what the next stage would look like.

If that next stage is renting, then meeting with your advisor ahead of time is recommended.   Once you sell, the good news is that you no longer have to worry about costs relating to home ownership, including property taxes, home insurance, repairs and maintenance.

Budgeting, when your only main expense is monthly rent, makes the process straight forward.  The key component is ensuring the proceeds from selling your house will be invested in a way that protects the capital and generates income to pay the rent.

The first step is determining the type of account in which to deposit the funds. The first account to fully fund is the Tax Free Savings Account (if not already fully funded). Then open a non-registered investment account for the proceeds.  Couples will typically open up a Joint With Right of Survivorship account.  Widows or singles will typically open up an Individual Account.

The second step is to begin mapping out how the funds will be invested within the two accounts above. A few types of investments that are great for generating income are REIT’s (Real Estate Investment Trust), blue chip common shares, and preferred shares.  Not only do these types of investments offer great income, they also offer tax efficient income, especially when compared to fully taxable interest income.

When you purchase a REIT, you are not only getting the benefit of a high yield, but you are generally getting part of this income as return of capital. The return of capital portion of the income is not considered taxable income for the current tax year.

As a result of receiving a portion of your capital back, your original purchase price is therefore decreased by the same amount. The result is that you are not taxed on this part of the income until you sell the investment at which point if there is a capital gain you will be taxed on only 50% of the gain at your marginal tax rate. You have now effectively lowered and deferred the tax on this income until you decide to sell the investment.

Buying a blue-chip common share or a preferred share gives you income in the form of a dividend. The tax rate on eligible dividends is considerably more favourable than interest income.

Another tax advantage with buying these types of investments is that any gain in value is only taxed when you decide to sell the investment and even then, you are only taxed on one half of the capital gain, referred to as a taxable capital gain. For example, if you decide to sell a stock that you purchased for $10,000 and the value of that stock increased to $20,000, you are only taxed on 50% of the capital gain. A $10,000 capital gain would translate to a $5,000 taxable capital gain.

We have outlined the approximate tax rates with a couple of assumptions.  Walking through the numbers helps clients understand the after-tax impact.

To illustrate, Mr. Jones has $60,000 in taxable income before investment income, and we will assume he makes $10,000 in investment income in 2016.  His marginal tax rate on interest income is 28.2%, on capital gains 14.1%, and only 7.56% on eligible dividends.

If Mr. Jones earned $10,000 in interest income, he would pay $2,820 in tax and net $7,180 in his pocket.  If Mr. Jones earned $10,000 of capital gains, he would pay $1,410 in tax and net $8,590 in his pocket.  If Mr. Jones earned $10,000 of eligible dividends, he would pay $756 in taxes and net $9,244 in his pocket.

The one negative to dividend income for those collecting Old Age Security (OAS) is that the actual income is first grossed up and increases line 242 on your income tax return. Below line 242 the dividend tax credit is applied.  The gross up of the dividend can cause some high income investors close to the OAS repayment threshold to have some, or all, of the OAS clawed back which should be factored into the after tax analysis.  The lower threshold for OAS claw-back is currently at $72,809.  If taxable income is below $72,809 then the claw-back is not applicable.  If income reported on line 242 is above $72,809 then OAS begins getting clawed back.  Once income reaches $118,055 then OAS is completely clawed back.

The schedule for dividend payments from blue chip equities and preferred shares is typically quarterly.  For REIT’s, it tends to be monthly. Once you decide on the amount you want to invest, then it is quite easy to give an estimated projection for after tax cash flow to be generated by the investments.

Preparing a budget of your monthly expenses makes it easy to automate the specific cash flow amount coming from your investment account directly into your chequing account.

Kevin Greenard, CPA CA FMA CFP CIM, is a Portfolio Manager and Director, Wealth Management with The Greenard Group at Scotia Wealth Management in Victoria.  His column appears every week in the TC.  Call 250.389.2138. greenardgroup.com 

This is for information purposes only. It is recommended that individuals consult with their financial advisor before acting on any information contained in this article. The opinions stated are those of the author and not necessarily those of Scotia Capital Inc. or The Bank of Nova Scotia. ScotiaMcLeod is a division of Scotia Capital Inc., Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund.

Let’s make things perfectly clear

CAPITAL MAGAZINE

When hiring an accountant or lawyer, you’re billed after services are rendered. In the investment world, it’s not so transparent. With embedded costs, market-value changes, withdrawals and deposits, it hasn’t always been clear exactly what you’ve been charged.

The introduction of fee-based accounts and recent regulatory changes are making significant strides in providing better transparency to investors.

In the past, most types of accounts were transactional, wherein commissions are charged for each transaction. With fee-based accounts, however, advisers don’t receive commissions. Instead, they agree to a set fee schedule, usually charged on a quarterly basis. This fee is normally based on a portfolio’s market value and composition. Buy and sell recommendations are based on the client’s needs and goals. If an investor’s account increases in value, so do the fees paid; conversely, if an account declines in value, fees go down.

The recent increase in fee-based accounts correlates to the implementation of the second phase of the “Client Relationship Model” (CRM), a regulatory initiative passed by the Canadian Securities Administrators in March 2012. The CRM affects both the Mutual Fund Dealers Association and the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada.

While the key objective of CRM1 was relationship disclosure and enhanced suitability, CRM2 is designed to increase transparency and disclosure on fees paid, services received, potential conflicts of interest and account performance. All of these mandatory disclosures are being phased in from 2014 to 2016.

Last July, CRM2 mandated pre-trade disclosure of all fees prior to an investor agreeing to buy or sell an investment. With transactional accounts, an adviser must disclose all of the fees a client is required to pay, such as commissions when buying or selling positions. Many investors have complained about hidden fees, especially in mutual funds. With CRM2, all of these fees now have to be disclosed prior to the transaction.

Certain types of transactions had no disclosure requirements in the past. For example, an adviser used to be able to purchase a bond and embed their commission in the cost of the bond on the trade confirmation slip. Now, fixed-income trades also require full disclosure. In other cases, even if there was disclosure in the legal sense of the word, understanding this disclosure required clients to read the fine print in lengthy prospectus documents.

With fee-based accounts, the client has a discussion about fees with their adviser up front, and an agreement with full disclosure is signed by investor and adviser.

Another reason for the popularity of the fee-based platform is that many advisers can offer both investment and planning-related services. Many advisers can offer detailed financial plans and access to experts in related areas, such as insurance, and will and estate planning.

In a traditional transactional account, where commissions are charged for every buy or sell, it has always been challenging for advisers to be compensated for additional services such as financial planning. Consequently, many transactional-based advisers would not offer these services to their clients.

Fee-based accounts also offer families one more opportunity for income splitting by setting up account-designated billing for their fees. The higher-income spouse can pay the fees for the lower-income spouse.

Another benefit of a fee-based structure for non-registered accounts is the ability to deduct investment counsel fees as carrying charges and interest expense. Anyone who has non-registered accounts would be well advised to read Canada Revenue Agency’s interpretation bulletin 238R2. Investment counsel fees cannot be deducted for registered accounts, but there is the benefit of paying the fees for registered accounts from a non-registered account.

Adviser-managed accounts have been the fastest-growing segment of the broad fee-based group. In this type of account, the adviser is licensed as a portfolio manager and able to use discretion to execute trades. In setting up the adviser-managed account, one of the criteria is that the account must be fee-based. Regulators have made it clear a portfolio manager is not permitted to use discretion when it comes to commissions or transaction charges. One of the starting points to setting up a managed account is to get a defined investment policy statement that sets out the relevant guidelines that will govern the management of the account.

Exploring the world of fixed income investments

The term fixed income can be confusing, especially when the financial industry has so many names for the same thing. For someone new to investing I typically draw a line down the middle of a page. On the left side of the page I label this “debt”, and on the right hand side I put “equity”. Debt is another term often associated with “fixed income”. In explaining what debt is I begin by using a simple example, a two year annual pay Guaranteed Investment Certificate (GIC). With a two year GIC you are giving your money to a company and in exchange you receive interest for the use of the capital. You receive your original capital back at the end of two years. You have no direct ownership in the company with debt.

The equity side of the page would have common shares, this is what most people would directly link to the stock exchange. Although some fixed income investments trade on a stock exchange, the majority of listed securities are equities. When the news is flashing details of the TSX/S&P Composite Index, the Dow, or the S&P 500 – these would all be equity indices reflected on the equity side.

Most people would agree that on the equity side of the page it would not be a good idea to put all your eggs in one basket. A prudent approach would be to diversify your equities by holdings various different stocks (i.e. between 20 and 30 different companies) in different sectors and geographies.

All too often I come across investment portfolios that have zero diversification on the fixed income side. As an example, it may be a person that has $500,000 or a million dollars all in GICs. In my opinion the best approach to fixed income is to have diversification – different types and different durations.

If we move back to the left hand side of the piece of paper, underneath debt we have already listed GICs. Let’s list a few other types of fixed income investments including: corporate bonds, government bonds, real return bonds, bond exchange traded funds, notes, coupons, preferred shares, debentures, bond mutual funds, etc.. Over the last decade there has been a huge growth in non-domestic bonds for retail investors. Perhaps one area that is often underutilized by many Canadians is the use of international bonds. Bonds are available in different developed countries. Advisors are able to purchase direct foreign bonds in developed countries and emerging markets. The emerging market bond space has opened up many different opportunities. With certain structured bond investments, these can be hedged to the Canadian dollar or not hedged (you are exposed to the currency risk).

Within each of the above main categories there are sub-categories. As an example, with bond ETFs one could purchase numerous different types, including: floating rate, short duration (example: one to five years), long duration, all corporate, all government, high yield, US bonds, etc.

Another example of subcategories can be explained using preferred shares as an example. Preferred Shares are generally classified as “fixed income” even though they pay dividend income (similar to common shares that are on the equity side of the page). For clients who have non-registered funds, a portion of your fixed income in preferred shares can be more tax efficient than interest paying investments. The main types of preferred shares are retractable, fixed-reset, floating rate, perpetual, and split. All have unique features that an advisor can explain to you.

When equity markets perform well it is natural that they become overweight in a portfolio. We encourage clients to periodically rebalance to their preferred asset mix. In good equity markets this involves selling some of the growth in equities and purchasing fixed income investments. When equity markets are declining, the process of rebalancing could result in selling fixed income and purchasing equities at lower levels.

The idea of adding “fixed income” is not that exciting in this low interest rate environment, especially when many “equity” investments have yields that exceed investment grade short duration bonds. Opportunities still exist in fixed income for reasonable yields, especially when you explore different types of fixed income. One always has to assess the risks they are comfortable with. As an example, I ask clients what they feel is the greater risk, stock market risk or interest rate risk. By stock market risk, I define this as the risk that the equity markets will have a correction or pull back (say, 10% or greater). By interest rate risk, I mean that interest rates will jump up materially and do so quickly (in a short period of time).

Every model portfolio I manage has fixed income. This is the capital preservation and income side to a portfolio. The percentage in fixed income really comes down to a clients risk tolerance and investment objectives. Time horizon and the ability to save additional capital is also a key component in determining the allocation to fixed income. It is important to first determine the right amount to allocate to fixed income, and second, to diversify it to enhance liquidity and overall returns.

Kevin Greenard CA FMA CFP CIM is a Portfolio Manager with The Greenard Group at ScotiaMcLeod in Victoria. His column appears every second week in the TC. Call 250-389-2138.

 

Behind the scenes with trade execution

If we define every transaction in an account as a trade then we can start a conversation about the basics of trade execution.

Some people may believe that trading is executed through a primary stock market. If we keep this article specific about Canada, the primary exchanges are Toronto Stock Exchange and the TSX Venture Exchange (for small and medium sized companies). Both of these exchanges have trading hours between 9:30 am and 4:00 pm eastern time, Monday to Friday, with the exception of certain holidays. In British Columbia, this means the primary exchanges close at 1:00 pm.

Over the last decade new marketplaces have emerged in Canada, these have been referred to as Alternative Trading Systems (or ATS). These systems at first grew in popularity because brokers were able to avoid paying the exchange trading fee. Also, an ATS may have different hours of operations than the primary exchanges. The Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) regulates the above noted primary exchanges and the following ATSs: Canadian Securities Exchange, Alpha Exchange, Bloomberg Tradebook, Chi-X Canada, CX2 Canada ATS, Instinet Canada Cross Limited, Liquidnet Canada Inc., Lynx ATS, MATCH Now, Omega ATS, and TMX Select.

When an advisor enters an order it may be executed on the primary exchanges, an ATS, or a combination of both. The main factors effecting where the trade is ultimately filled is best available price, historical liquidity, and likelihood of execution. If a Canadian trade is executed on just one exchange then your confirmation slip would have a message something like “AS AGENTS, WE TODAY CONFIRM THE FOLLOWING BUY/SALE FOR YOUR ACCOUNT ON THE TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE/CANADIAN VENTURE EXCHANGE/ALPHA/OMEGA/ etc.” If the Canadian security transaction was executed by a combination of exchanges/ATS then the message on the confirmation slip would reflect this by stating something like “AS AGENTS, WE TODAY CONFIRM THE FOLLOWING BUY/SALE FOR YOUR ACCOUNT ON ONE OR MORE MARKETPLACES OR MARKETS. AVERAGE PRICE SHOWN. DETAILS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST“.

For example, a client wants to sell 2,500 of ABC Company at market after watching BNN and seeing the the price per share at $15.59. If all the shares were sold and executed at this price, the proceeds would be $38,975. The actual value once we enter the order is almost always different. The reason for this is both depth of quote and dark liquidity.

Depth of quote is when we can see the quantity of shares available and the current bid and ask at each price level. Prior to the above trade execution I outlined the depth of quote with my client (see table below). Advisors assisting retail clients typically have what is called Level II quotes where they can see both bid and ask at different price levels – I refer to this transparent part of the market as the “lit” system. Using the above example of a client wanting to sell 2,500 shares of ABC Company at market, the beginning few lines of the bid side of a depth of quote/level II would provide the following information:

Depth of Quote/Level II

Orders          Size           Bid

14                       700            $15.57

22                     1,600           $15.54

  9                     4,200           $15.50

  3                      9,000           $15.40

15                    10,000           $15.37

Orders represent the number of limit orders entered on the lit system. It is possible for the same client to enter multiple limit orders. Size is the number of shares available at the bid price on the lit system.

Using the above Level II table, 700 shares would be sold (also referred to as filled) at $15.57, 1,600 filled at $15.54, and 200 filled at $15.50. An Advisor could communicate to the client what is visible on the lit system and that the total estimated proceeds would equal $38,863. It is possible that once the sell button is pressed that the actual trade is executed at a higher price as a result of dark liquidity (also referred to as dark pools).

Dark liquidity is a term that relates to traders being able to enter orders without providing the above transparency to other market participants. Effectively, the trades are not transparent or lit; thus the term dark pool came about because the orders can not be seen. Retail clients and advisors typically do not have direct access to entering trades with dark liquidity. Most financial firms have traders that assist Portfolio Managers, Wealth Advisors and institutional clients with larger trades.

Traders can use dark pools on both the primary exchanges and ATS. Dark pool trades in Canada are nearly all limit orders, and are typically done for institutions executing large trades. Using the above table, if an advisor entered an order to sell 100,000 shares at market, the price would immediately get driven down to as low as $15.00 (assuming no dark pool orders to buy). The benefit of dark liquidity for institutions is that they do not have to “show their cards” before they are played. In other words, an institution may want to sell 100,000 shares of ABC Company with a limit price of $15.57. A trader could work the order with acquiring smaller fills without creating big swings in the price of the security. The trader could enter a limit order putting 20,000 shares on the lit system so it shows on level II, enter 50,000 in a dark pool at the same price so it is not displayed, and hold off entering the remaining 30,000 in order to continue to work the order.

Wealth Advisors must verbally confirm each trade with clients and then execute the trade right after they obtain confirmation. With frequent small trades at different points in time, dark pool trades are not generally used in Canada at the retail level. In the US, dark pools are much more common, even for smaller sized trades. Some individual clients may have large holdings in a particular security and the traders are available to assist. Portfolio Managers on the other hand often execute large block trades (combining all the shares for all clients) on a discretionary basis. Once a quantity of shares to buy or sell is determined the Portfolio Manager is often in direct communication with the traders.  Together they can choose to use dark pools, or not.

Dark liquidity is still relatively small in Canada when compared to the United States. Earlier this year, the US Securities and Exchange Commission noted that around 40 per cent of all U.S. stock trades avoid the exchanges. The increase in dark pool transactions make it more challenging to determine the true liquidity and price transparency of a security. Market makers assist in the lit market but are non-existent in the dark pool. The Canadian Securities Administrator and IIROC have already implemented a few rules with respect to dark liquidity and I would suspect that further rules will be unveiled in the future.

 

Kevin Greenard CA FMA CFP CIM is a Portfolio Manager with The Greenard Group at ScotiaMcLeod in Victoria. His column appears every second week in the TC. Call 250-389-2138.

 

Portfolio manager can act for clients more quickly than traditional adviser

Over the years, I have had great discussions with people about financial decision-making. It is tough for most people to make decisions on something they don’t feel informed about. 

Even when you are informed, investment decisions can be challenging.

When you work with a financial advisor, you have another person to discuss your options with. In the traditional approach, an advisor will present you with some investment recommendations or options.  You still have to make a decision with respect to either confirming the recommendation and saying “yes” or “no,” or choosing among the options presented. As an example, an advisor may give you low-, medium-, and high-risk options for new purchases. An advisor should provide recommendations that are suitable to your investment objectives and risk tolerance.

Another option for clients have is to have a managed account, sometimes referred to as a discretionary account.  With this type of account, clients do not have to make decisions. The challenge is that very few financial advisors have the appropriate licence to even offer this option.   To offer it, advisors need to have have either the Associate Portfolio Manager or Portfolio Manager title.

When setting up the managed accounts, one of the required documents is an Investment Policy Statement (IPS). The IPS outlines the parameters in which the Portfolio Manager can use his or her discretion. As an example, you could have in the IPS that you wish to have a minimum of 40 per cent in fixed income, such as bonds and GICs.

Portfolio Managers are held to a higher duty of care, often referred to as a fiduciary responsibility. Portfolio Managers have to spend a significant time to obtain an understanding of your specific needs and risk tolerance. These discussions should be consistent with how the IPS is set up. Any time you have a material change in your circumstances then the IPS should be updated. At least every two years, if not more frequently, the IPS should be reviewed.

The nice part of having a managed account with an up to date IPS is that your advisor is able to make the decisions on your behalf. You can be free to work hard and earn income without having to commit time to researching investments. You can spend time travelling and doing the activities you enjoy. Many of my clients are intelligent people who are fully capable of doing the investments themselves but see the value in paying a small fee. The fee is tax deductible for non-registered accounts and all administrative matters for taxation, etc. are taken care of. A good advisor adds significantly more value than the fees they charge. This is especially true if you value your time.

Many aging couples have one additional factor to consider. In many cases one person has made all the financial decisions for the household. If that person passes away first, it is often a very stressful burden that you are passing onto the surviving spouse. I’ve had couples come in to meet me primarily as a contingency plan. The one spouse that is independently handling the finances should provide the surviving spouse some direction of who to go see in the event of incapacity or death. In my opinion, the contingency plan should involve a portfolio manager that can use his or her discretion to make financial decisions.

In years past it was easier to deal with aging clients. Clients could simply put funds entirely in bonds and GICs and obtain a sufficient income flow. With near historic low interest rates, this income flow has largely dried up for seniors. When investors talk about income today, higher income options exist with many blue chip equities. Of course, dividend income is more tax efficient than interest income as well. A portfolio manager can add significant value for clients that are aging and require investments outside of GICs.

Try picturing a traditional financial advisor with a few hundred clients. A traditional financial advisor has to phone and verbally confirm each trade before it can be entered. The markets in British Columbia open at 6:30 AM and close at 1:00 PM. An advisor books meetings with clients often weeks in advance. On Tuesday morning an advisor wakes up and some bad news comes out about a stock that all your clients own. That same advisor has 5 meetings in the morning and has only a few small openings to make calls that day. It can take days for an advisor to phone all clients assuming they are all home and answer the phone and have time to talk.

A Portfolio Manager who can use his or her discretion can make one block trade (the sum of all of his clients’ shares in a company) and exit the position in seconds.

Sometimes making quick decisions in the financial markets to take advantage of opportunities is necessary. Hands down, a Portfolio Manager can react quicker than a traditional advisor who has to confirm each trade verbally with each client.