Portfolio manager can act for clients more quickly than traditional adviser

Over the years, I have had great discussions with people about financial decision-making. It is tough for most people to make decisions on something they don’t feel informed about. 

Even when you are informed, investment decisions can be challenging.

When you work with a financial advisor, you have another person to discuss your options with. In the traditional approach, an advisor will present you with some investment recommendations or options.  You still have to make a decision with respect to either confirming the recommendation and saying “yes” or “no,” or choosing among the options presented. As an example, an advisor may give you low-, medium-, and high-risk options for new purchases. An advisor should provide recommendations that are suitable to your investment objectives and risk tolerance.

Another option for clients have is to have a managed account, sometimes referred to as a discretionary account.  With this type of account, clients do not have to make decisions. The challenge is that very few financial advisors have the appropriate licence to even offer this option.   To offer it, advisors need to have have either the Associate Portfolio Manager or Portfolio Manager title.

When setting up the managed accounts, one of the required documents is an Investment Policy Statement (IPS). The IPS outlines the parameters in which the Portfolio Manager can use his or her discretion. As an example, you could have in the IPS that you wish to have a minimum of 40 per cent in fixed income, such as bonds and GICs.

Portfolio Managers are held to a higher duty of care, often referred to as a fiduciary responsibility. Portfolio Managers have to spend a significant time to obtain an understanding of your specific needs and risk tolerance. These discussions should be consistent with how the IPS is set up. Any time you have a material change in your circumstances then the IPS should be updated. At least every two years, if not more frequently, the IPS should be reviewed.

The nice part of having a managed account with an up to date IPS is that your advisor is able to make the decisions on your behalf. You can be free to work hard and earn income without having to commit time to researching investments. You can spend time travelling and doing the activities you enjoy. Many of my clients are intelligent people who are fully capable of doing the investments themselves but see the value in paying a small fee. The fee is tax deductible for non-registered accounts and all administrative matters for taxation, etc. are taken care of. A good advisor adds significantly more value than the fees they charge. This is especially true if you value your time.

Many aging couples have one additional factor to consider. In many cases one person has made all the financial decisions for the household. If that person passes away first, it is often a very stressful burden that you are passing onto the surviving spouse. I’ve had couples come in to meet me primarily as a contingency plan. The one spouse that is independently handling the finances should provide the surviving spouse some direction of who to go see in the event of incapacity or death. In my opinion, the contingency plan should involve a portfolio manager that can use his or her discretion to make financial decisions.

In years past it was easier to deal with aging clients. Clients could simply put funds entirely in bonds and GICs and obtain a sufficient income flow. With near historic low interest rates, this income flow has largely dried up for seniors. When investors talk about income today, higher income options exist with many blue chip equities. Of course, dividend income is more tax efficient than interest income as well. A portfolio manager can add significant value for clients that are aging and require investments outside of GICs.

Try picturing a traditional financial advisor with a few hundred clients. A traditional financial advisor has to phone and verbally confirm each trade before it can be entered. The markets in British Columbia open at 6:30 AM and close at 1:00 PM. An advisor books meetings with clients often weeks in advance. On Tuesday morning an advisor wakes up and some bad news comes out about a stock that all your clients own. That same advisor has 5 meetings in the morning and has only a few small openings to make calls that day. It can take days for an advisor to phone all clients assuming they are all home and answer the phone and have time to talk.

A Portfolio Manager who can use his or her discretion can make one block trade (the sum of all of his clients’ shares in a company) and exit the position in seconds.

Sometimes making quick decisions in the financial markets to take advantage of opportunities is necessary. Hands down, a Portfolio Manager can react quicker than a traditional advisor who has to confirm each trade verbally with each client.