Tax tips for Americans in Canada

Recommendation No. 1: Seek advice on reporting requirements

Most countries, including Canada, do not tax on the basis of citizenship. For example, Canadian citizens who live in Canada pay tax in Canada on the taxable income they earn. If a Canadian citizen moved abroad a few years ago, with no continued ties to Canada, it is most likely this individual would be considered “non-resident” and would have no tax reporting obligation to Canada. In other words, Canadians are taxed based on residency.

The U.S. tax system is different as it treats all U.S. citizens as U.S. residents for tax purposes, no matter where they live in the world, including Canada. Many U.S. citizens live in Canada and are resident here. A U.S. citizen has to pay tax in Canada on taxable income if they are resident for Canadian tax purposes.   Canada and the U.S. have entered into various agreements (i.e. tax treaties) to address taxation differences and to largely avoid double taxation.  

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the U.S. has been trying to crack down on American taxpayers using financial accounts held outside of the U.S. to evade taxes. For example, the U.S. introduced the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), signed into law on March 2010, with the objective of identifying taxpayers evading taxes. To do that required co-operation from other countries to provide information.  

The U.S. effectively told Canada that if it did not comply, then all income from U.S. investments would be subject to a 30 per cent withholding tax. This threat of withholding was for both registered and non-registered investment accounts.

Previously, Canada was not required to withhold any tax on U.S. investments held in registered accounts. For non-registered accounts, the negotiated tax treaty had withholding rates on U.S. dividends at 15 per cent and nil for US interest income.

Earlier this year, Canada and the U.S. signed an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) regarding FATCA, in which Canada agreed to pass laws requiring that, primarily through financial institutions, that annual reports be made to the Canada Revenue Agency on specified accounts held in Canada by U.S. persons. The agreement brings Canada, via the CRA, into a reporting agreement to satisfy FACTA.

Under the agreement, the U.S. has agreed not to apply the 30 per cent withholding tax on registered accounts, such as RRSPs, TFSAs and RESPs, and to maintain the existing withholding rates for non-registered accounts.

Effective July 1, 2014, an amendment to the Canada Income Tax Act adopting Canadian tax regulations related to FATCA.   Also beginning in July 2014, financial institutions have new requirements to report to the CRA, not the IRS. Clients of financial institutions will be required to complete additional mandatory questions for all non-registered accounts. New account-opening forms will require you to state if they are a citizens of Canada, and if they are a citizen of the U.S. Another question is, “Are you a U.S. Person (Entity) for tax purposes?” Certain legal entities must answer a new classification question relating to active or passive entity.

For the purposes of FATCA, here are some examples of who is deemed a U.S. Person (Entity):

  • U.S. citizens, include persons with dual citizenship, U.S. residency,
  • Any person who meets the IRS “Substantial Presence Test of U.S. Residency,”
  • U.S. resident aliens (Green Card holders who do not have U.S. citizenship),
  • Persons born in the U.S. or who hold a U.S. Social Security Number (SSN) or U.S. Tax Identification Number (TIN) or a U.S. Place of incorporation or registration

Financial firms have a mandatory obligation to provide this information to CRA. CRA will begin sharing relevant information pertaining to the agreement with the IRS starting in 2015.

For the majority of Canadians, this is a non-issue. For the approximately one to two million people in Canada that would be deemed a U.S. Person (Entity), it reinforces the need to have all of your tax filings up to date with both the IRS and CRA.

Sharing information electronically between CRA and the IRS will enable the IRS to obtain information on U.S. Persons (Entities) that have not fulfilled their reporting obligations.

Other indicators must also be reviewed, including U.S. address (residence, mailing, in-care-of, or interested party), U.S. telephone number, standing instructions to transfer funds to an account held by the client in the U.S., a power of attorney or signatory authority granted to a person with a U.S. address.

Many snowbirds have asked me what their requirements are under FATCA. Reviewing the “Substantial Presence Test of US Residency” on the IRS website is a good starting point. A wealth advisor should have enough knowledge about FATCA to make sure your accounts are documented correctly and that they are asking you the right questions.

I recommend every client who is not sure if they have a reporting obligation to consult with an independent tax advisor to determine if they are a U.S. person for tax purposes. It is important that the accountant you approach has knowledge in these areas to be able to provide you appropriate advice.

Effective July 1, 2014, financial institutions are required by law to report annually to CRA on accounts where a client is unwilling or unable to provide documentation for FATCA, one of more U.S. owners are specified ”U.S. Persons,” undocumented account holders for FATCA purposes, and passive entity with one or more controlling persons that are specified “U.S. Persons.” The information that must be sent to CRA includes name, address, TIN/SIN and total account value.

If you are not sure if you have a reporting obligation, we encourage you to speak with your wealth advisor who should be able to communicate with your independent tax professional, and together ensure your financial accounts are documented correctly and you are fulfilling your reporting requirement, if any.  

This article is intended as a general source of information and should not be considered as personal investment, tax or pension advice. We are not tax advisors and we recommend that individuals consult with their professional tax advisor before taking any action based upon the information found in this publication.